Watch the 2019 Nobel Banquet live – worldwide

Watch the Nobel Banquet live - worldwide

Stockholm is getting ready to welcome the Nobel Prize Laureates for the Nobel Award Ceremony and the Nobel Banquet, both on December 10.

Alfred Nobel was a dynamic scientist, inventor and industrialist. You can read more about the Nobel story further down the page.

Nobel Banquet on Tuesday, December 10, 2019

The Nobel Banquet with the laureates, the Royal family and many celebrities takes place in the Blue Hall of the Stockholm City Hall on December 10 at 7.00 p.m. (19:00) CET.

City Hall, Stockholm

Webcast: Watch the 2019 Nobel Banquet live

Watch the Nobel Banquet on SVT Play, which is the Swedish public service TV channel. The program is in Swedish but most of the interviews will be conducted in English – and the pictures of the festive event will speak for themselves, of course.

The program starts at 7.00 p.m. Central European Time (19:00 CET), Dec. 10:

www.svtplay.se/nobel

You can watch it until June 7, 2020

If you miss the live webcast, the above link will still give you the opportunity to watch the four and a half hour long program. SVT will make the video recordings available for six months, until June 7, 2020.

More info


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The famous Grand Hotel opposite the Royal Palace accommodates the Nobel Prize winners every year around December 10.


  Learn more about Nobel on these Stockholm tours


Background: The Nobel story

Since its introduction in 1901, the Nobel Prize has exerted a strong influence on the sciences worldwide. In the spirit of Alfred Nobel, the links between innovation, entrepreneurship and academic research in Stockholm remain strong to this day. For visitors interested in the award and its history, there is a plethora of Nobel-related sites to explore in the city.

Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite

Alfred Nobel (1833 – 1896) was born in Stockholm and the prize he established is strongly associated with Stockholm and its scientific and cultural institutions.

The Nobel Prize

In his will, Nobel decided that a large part of his fortune would go to establishing a prize in five different categories: Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature and a Peace Prize. The first Nobel Prize was awarded on December 10, 1901.

The Nobel Week begins in the second week of December each year. The Nobel Laureates come to Stockholm to participate in an extensive program of festivities and academic events arranged by the Nobel Foundation.

The week culminates on Nobel Day, December 10, when the Laureates receive the prize from Sweden’s King Carl XVI Gustaf at the Stockholm Concert Hall (Konserthuset). The Prize ceremony is followed by a banquet in the Stockholm City Hall (Stadshuset). Both the Nobel prize Award Ceremony and the Nobel Banquet are broadcast live (see above) and followed by over a million viewers.

The Nobel Peace Prize is awarded in Oslo on the same day.

The Nobel Prize Museum

The Nobel Prize Museum in Stockholm was opened in 2001, in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize. The museum showcases the story of founder Alfred Nobel, the many Nobel Laureates throughout the years and the award itself using fascinating displays, short films, and much more. The museum is located on Stortorget square in Gamla Stan (the Old Town).

In the museum restaurant you can enjoy the famous Nobel ice cream which was served as dessert at the Nobel Prize Banquets during 1976 – 1998 and is exclusive to the museum. Also – don’t forget to turn your café chair upside down while you are there, the chairs are signed by Nobel Laureates who have visited the museum.

For about seven years (2011 – 2018), there were also plans to build a completely new Nobel Center on the peninsula of Blasieholmen in the centre of Stockholm. This project has been abandoned (see link above, under “More info”).


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Source: VisitSweden US, Visit Stockholm; featured image: Nobel Media AB/Photo/Helena Paulin-Strömberg